†slave ship "Brookes" -- Image Reference JCB_01138-1
Shows the two major slave decks and how enslaved Africans were crammed into them
Click image to see larger picture
Image from Slavery Images.Org



Florida's AnteBellum Plantations Part 1



Ante Bellum Era 1845-1861
Antebellum means "before the war" and it is most often described as the period between the War of 1812 and the Civil War.
Florida became the twenty-seventh state in the United States on March 3, 1845 and the slavery issue began to dominate the affairs of the new state.
Florida grew between 1845 and 1860.  The ideas and material wealth grew also.
There were seven great planting counties, Alachua, Gadsden, Jackson, Jefferson, Leon, Madison, and Marion.  They were also the centers of both wealth and population.  The seven planting counties were also the greatest slave holders.  Despite all the expansion and growth, Florida at the outbreak of the Civil War had fewer factories and towns, less wealth population than any other slave state.
The 1850s were truly the decade of King Cotton. Demand was high, prices remained strong, and aggressive planters put into production new acreage as older fields became unproductive.
The Civil War brought an abrupt end to the prosperity enjoyed by southern planters.


* The Census returns listed almost 1,000 cotton plantations in Florida in 1850. Only 200 of those were large enough to use 30 or more slaves and some used 100 or more.
**The Plantation owners below are listed in the Tax Books, dated 1850 and 1860
as having 100 or more slaves.

OWNERS ACRES SLAVES COUNTY
*C. E. Haile 3,000 156 Alachua
*John B Stanley (San Felasco Laurel Hill) 15,115 124 Alachua
**D. R. Williams 1,000 152 Alachua
*John Whitaker 1,840 118 Alachua
**James L. Young 3,000 156 Alachua
**Charles H. Dupont 5,800 108 Gadsden
**H.R. Harris 2,550 132 Gadsden
**William Kilcrease Estate 4,120 160 Gadsden
**Mrs. S. A. Lines 3476 106 Gadsden
**John H. Smith 2,500 109 Gadsden
**L. W. B. Belcher 2,025 103 Jackson
**John D. Myrick 5,060 197 Jackson
**G. W. Russ 840 109 Jackson
*David Barrow 1,800 128 Jefferson
**John Bradley 4,980 155 Jefferson
**Robert Gamble 5,760 186 Jefferson
**R. H. Gamble 2,980 108 Jefferson
**George Jones 4,640 108 Jefferson
**Edward P. Willey 1,700 108 Jefferson
**J.L. Cottrell 2,097 100 Lafayette
**James W. Mc Queen 1,625 110 Lafayette
**J. C. Blake 1,620 116 Leon
**James Kirksay 2,250 180 Leon
**William Lester 3,330 136 Leon
*James Whitehead-father
John B. Whitehead-son
(Forest Hill)
2,500 Leon
**J. J. Williams 7,000 245 Leon
**J. L. Hopkins 1,795 124 Marion


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~~~~ The Crooms ~~~~


The Goodwood Plantation
The Goodwood Plantation
       

Left: Photo credit: The Florida Center for Instructional Technology,
University of South Florida
Right:♥♥Photo Credit: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://floridamemory.com/items/show/35225
♥♥Photographer: Gerrish.
♥♥"This photograph from a likeness by Inman? or Mifflin?"


HARDY AND BRYAN CROOM
Goodwood Plantation
2,400 acres
Location: Leon County
and
Bryan Croom
Rocky Comfort plantation
Location: Gadsden County
La Grange
1,500 acres

The estate known as Goodwood was assembled in the early 1830s by Hardy Croom, the first owner, of North Carolina.
♥During the 1820s Hardy, the eldest child, joined his father, William Croom, on trips to the Florida Territory and began acquiring land. After the death of his father, William, in 1829, Hardy went to Florida to manage the plantations his father had established there. Hardy continued to acquire thousands of acres in Florida and established Goodwood Plantation just outside of Tallahassee. Goodwood later would be completed by Hardy’s younger brother Bryan.(see below)
♥While Hardy’s love was not the law, he did have a keen interest in geology, mineralogy and botany and gained international recognition for his work in botany and his publication of a number of papers. He discovered several indigenous trees and plants and a southern flower that is named after him: the Croomia. Tragically, however, he is most remembered for his untimely death on his fortieth birthday.
  Hardy and Bryan developed the Plantation to over four thousand acres with nearly two hundred slaves before Hardy's plans for a full-time Florida residence were dashed.   Hardy, his wife, Frances H. Smith Croom, and three children died when the steamship they were traveling on,THE HOME, sank in a hurricane south of Cape Hatteras on October 7, 1837, while en route to Florida.
♥♥Croom Monument on grounds of St. Johns Episcopal Church

♥Hardy died intestate, the matter of his estate was challenged in court by his mother-in-law, Henrietta Smith of New Bern.
( ¤Henrietta Smith listed in Leon County Tax Book, dated 1860 as having 6,184 acres and 149 slaves)
(5During the 20 year court battle property was sold to Turbett Betton on which he built and named his home Betton Hills or Betton Place.)
That case would take 20 years and finally be determined by the Florida State Supreme Court in a landmark decision. The Court in its’ ruling established case law: Presumptions to the order of death in a common calamity.

Bryan Croom
¹Although the Goodwood gardens owe their existence to both Hardy and Bryan Croom, it was Hardy’s interest in botany and understanding of soils and climates that led him to select Goodwood for its interesting botanical diversity and its potential as a profitable agricultural enterprise. It was he who began amassing the land, moving slaves onto the property, and producing cotton and corn. Hardy’s sudden death placed his brother, Bryan, in charge of Goodwood, and although Bryan did not seem to share his brother’s interest in botany, it is evident that he was every bit as successful at farming, having managed his own large plantation in Gadsden County for nearly 10 years.
Goodwood was surrounded by large shade trees, cotton was the major crop there.
¹Bryan Croom was living on his Rocky Comfort plantation in Gadsden County and his brother Hardy was growing cotton on land next to his brother Hardy. Their brother George Alexander Crooms (see below) was the owner of Casa de Lago plantation and brother Richard Croom of Oakland Plantation (see below)
¹Bryan’s contribution to Goodwood was sizeable; under his guidance, the Main House was completed in the mid-1840s and the 2,400 acre plantation took its place among the agricultural giants of Leon County. Bryan established a level of presentation and hospitality that reflected the prominence of the Croom family, the grandeur of the house, and the size of the plantation in the 1840s and 1850s. During this time, Goodwood provided for and maintained 250 people within its 8,000 acres, and this agricultural stability under Bryan Croom gave Goodwood its roots, its sense of life on a grand scale and much of its early prestige.
 A native of North Carolina Croom settled in Gadsden County in 1826 with his family and slaves.  Goodwood was not the most elaborate plantations but it had such things as silver door fittings ordered from England, 16 sets of French doors and scenes from Aesop's Fables frescoed on the south parlor ceiling.  Croom cultivated cotton and prospered to such an extent that he became one of the largest landholders in middle Florida.
‡Bryan Croom is listed in the Leon County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as being 47 years old and having 195 slaves, 4,400 acres and (1)236 bales and (2)250 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.
Bryan's purchase of LaGrange turned the Croom ownership into an L. his land joining his brother Richard Croom's Oakland.
Bryan sold his LaGrange Plantation to Joseph John Williams.
 The family of Bryan Croom's sister-in-law sued Bryan for a portion of the estate he inherited from his brother Hardy.  A complicated case, it was not settled until 1857.  Bryan Croom lost his case and Goodwood was purchased by Arvah Hopkins (see below) who made Goodwood a popular center for Tallahassee society from the 1850s through the 1880s. Goodwood have had several owners since the Croom family.

NOTE:
Bryan extended his estate during the decade but had to dispose of all of it, even his house Goodwood, after losing "the steamboat Home case" in 1857. Bryan left the state during the decade.

--------------------

George Alexander Crooms
Rocky Comfort Plantation traded for Casa de Lago Plantation
Location: Leon County

²²George Alexander Crooms,younger brother of Hardy B. and Bryan Crooms of Goodwood Plantation (see above) was born October 7, 1821. Died July 5, 1890, Married to Julia M Church, born in 1843, the children were, Hardy, Alonzo Church, William Church, Sarah Jane, Julia Church, Elizabeth C., Ann Eloise and Louisa.
♥Benjamin F. Whitner, a wealthy cultivator, built the house and planted an immense floral garden, then in 1850 virtually exchanged his 1,127 acres, in Leon County, for George Alexander Crooms's 1,600 acres in Gadsden County. Crooms soon doubled Whitner's 90 bale cotton crop. Croom changed from the dying technology with a waterwheel to steam: a ten-horsepower steam engine drove his cotton gin and gristmill.
¹¹G.A. Crooms is listed in Leon County Tax Book, dated 1860 as having 1,128 acres and 70 slaves.
* George Alexander Crooms is listed in the Gadsden County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as being 28 years old and as having 59 slaves, 1680 acres and 146 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.

NOTE:
²²In 1883 Casa de Laga was sold to H. D. McColloch of Wisconsin. McColloch then sold the plantation 6 months later to Professor E. Warren Clark of Narragansett Pier, Rhode Island and Austin M. Purvis of Philadelphia. Clark would eventually turn the plantation into a game preserve. In 1891, a Charles T. Wilson of Cincinnati opened the Lake Jackson Hunting Lodge on the property.

--------------------


Richard Crooms

     

♥♥Left: Richard Crooms (1805-1859)
Right: Family Portrait--Croom, Nicholas, Whitfield, Mary Croom, 1836-1867, Croom, Richard

♥♥Both Photo Credit: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://floridamemory.com/items/show/25843


Oakland Plantation
(John McGehee also owned a plantation
named Oakland in Madison County)
Location: Leon County

²Richard Crooms, brother to, Hardy B. and half brother to Bryan Crooms of Goodwood Plantation and George Alexander Croom (see above).
²Richard's plantation joined Bryan's La Grange plantation.
♥♥ Richard was married to Mary Whitifield, they had at least one child Nicholas
†Richard Crooms is listed in the Leon County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as being 45 years old and having 65 slaves, and 200 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.

---------------------------


Arvah Hopkins

Image courtesy of: Florida Photographic Collection

Arvah Hopkins
(Owner from 1858--1885)
Goodwood Plantation
Location: Leon County

Arvah Hopkins, bought Goodwood plantation after Bryan Cooms (above), brother of Hardy Crooms, lost the suit brought against him by the family of his late sister-in-law for a portion of Goodwood that was left to him by his brother.
¹Hopkins did not initially share the intense interest in botany or agriculture that Hardy or Bryan Croom had.
¹ Arvah was a merchant when he moved his family to Goodwood, and during his ownership increased the plantation’s holdings as well as its profits (pre-Civil War). The agriculture census reports during the Hopkins’ years show an increase in farm equipment with less reliance on livestock (except for mules and cattle) and a shift in crops. The amount of Indian corn and cotton grown dropped while sweet potatoes increased, and peas, beans, hay, butter, and wine were also produced. Although the plantation would never again be as large as it had been during the Croom era, it did continue to prosper financially, utilizing more agricultural equipment and growing a wide range of crops.
♣ Hopkins was married to John Branch of Waverly Plantation daughter Susan.

--------------------

DAVID YULEE

   

Left: The Sugar Mill
Photo credit: Florida Photograph Collection,
University of South Florida Libraries
Right: David Yulee --image is in public domain.

Click here for more sugar mill ruin photos


The Sugar Mill
Photo credit: Florida Photograph Collection,
University of South Florida Libraries

DAVID YULEE
Cotton Wood Plantation
David Levy Yulee was born in St. Thomas, West Indies, in 1810.  He was a Lawyer, politician (he became the first person of Jewish faith elected to the U.S. Senate), railroad builder, and sugar plantation owner.
Originally known as David Levy, he had his name changed by an act of the Florida Legislature in 1845.  By 1851, the sugar mill had 1,000 workers.  Yulee was a supporter of slavery, and for the next ten years, the mill prospered.  During the Civil War the mill supplied the Confederate troops.  Yulee's home was burned by Union troops and Yulee himself was briefly imprisoned.  He was released by Ulysses Grant to return to his railroad business.
He did then returned to the pursuit of building the Florida railroad and served as president of the Florida Railroad Company, 1853-1866, president of Peninsular Railroad Company, Tropical Florida Railway Company, and Fernandina and Jacksonville Railroad Company.  He was called the "Father of Florida's railroads".  (Cottonwood was raided and pillaged in 1863 and again in 1864 by Federal forces based at Cedar Key).   As a result the plantation never recovered its productivity and never resumed operation after the War.


--------------------

*Douglas Dummett
Mount Pleasant Plantation

Douglas was the son of Colonel Thomas Dummett who owned the former Addison Plantation (Carrickfergus). Douglas lived on his father's plantation for a while.
♥He married the daughter of a socially prominent family, but she later deserted him.
Douglas then bought land in New Smyrna, built his plantation and called it Mount Pleasant.
♥Douglas then married a young black slave girl, Anna, and they had three daughters and a son.
His son Charles, died on the plantation, age 16, and was buried where he fell. (Later when the plantation was developed for residential homes, Charles Dummett's grave was left in the center of the divided Canova Drive).see photos
Dummett later moved to the Merrit Island property and made it one of the largest orange groves in the state. (see below)


DUMMETT GROVE
After moving from his Mount Pleasent plantation Douglas established his plantation in that part of Merritt Island and began to grow oranges. Dummett used a new grafting technique later widely adopted in Florida. Unlike many coastal planters, Dummett did not abandon his property during the Second Seminole War (1835-42).
He served as captain in the "Mosquito Roarers," a Florida Militia company formed to protect property in that area from Indian raids.
Dummett continued to cultivate what was regarded as East Florida's most valuable orange groves until his death in 1873.
♥Dummett used a new grafting technique later widely adopted in Florida. He grafted buds from sweet orange trees onto his sour orange trees. This method produced frost-resistant trees and was called top-grafting because budding began several feet above ground.
♥By 1866 his grove was the largest in the state with 1700 trees. The Dummett Groves is considered the forerunner of the modern citrus industry and the original home of the Indian River orange. Douglas Dummett died in 1873 and was buried on Merritt Island.
The grove was severely damaged by a hurricane in 1893 and freezes in 1894 and 1895 and could not recover.
The property became part of Kennedy Space Center in 1963.


-------------------------


John A. Craig
‡Andalusia Plantation
Leon County


‡Dr.John A. Craig was from Maryland.
He was born around 1806, died around 1893, married Sarah Armstrong, they had at least 3 children. Their son John Armstrong Craig (1836-1885) married Susan Frances Eppes ( the daughter of Francis Wayles Eppes and his second wife Susan Ware in 1861.
John later married Sallie A Keene. He went back to Maryland. I don't know if he moved before or after the second marriage.
John was a kinsman of William Pickney Craig (see below), I don't know their relationship. One of his son with Sallie Keene was named William Pickney Craig.
There was a John A. craig listed on the 1840 Leon county census.


+John A. Craig is listed in the Leon County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as having 50 slaves, 1540 acres and 180 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.
¤J. A. Craig listed in Leon County Tax Book, dated 1860 as having 1,150 acres and 44slaves

NOTE:
There was a John A. Craig (older) and a John Armstrong Craig (younger) and
even a third John Armstrong Craig (Jr.) son of the younger Craig in Florida.




-------------------------


William Craig
Location: Leon county

William Pickney Craig was from Maryland and was married to Hanna S..
He was a kinsman of John Armstrong Craig. I don't know what the relationship was.
These people are listed on the Leon, FL 1850 Federal Census as living with William Craig.
Craig Wm. P. (45 Planter)
Craig Hannah (32)
Craig Florence (3)
On the Leon, FL 1860 Federal Census W. P Craig 52 yrs. Farmer is listed as living in a household alone and his wife and child is listed as living in a household with an agent Craig Hannah S. (42)
Craig Florence R. (12)
He could have had more than 1 plantation in Leon county.

¤William P. Craig listed in Leon County Tax Book, dated 1860 as having 1,040 acres and 38 slaves



-------------------------



~~~~ The Mays ~~~~

Richard J. Mays

Photo Credit: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, Florida Memory Project
Richard J. Mays ¹Clifton Plantation
Location: Madison County
(had 1 other plantation)

    Richard Johnston Mays (1808-1864) had other planter brothers --James, Enoch and Rhydon G. Mays..
♦ Richard was the seventh child of Samuel and Nancy Grigsby Mays. Richard married Eliza Anne Williams in 1829. Richard and his family along with James, his brother, and his family came to Florida together. Later other of his brothers also came to Florida. His brother D. H. (Dannitte Hill) Mays married Emmala Bellamy Parkhill, daughter of George Washington Parkhill.
All listed as having one of the largest plantation in Madison County in 1850
♠Richard was a Baptist minister. He founded the Concord Baptist Church in 1841.
His older brother James who also farmed in the same area died in 1836 from wounds received during the Seminole War.
Richard and Eliza's son, Richard J. Mays (jr.) married Mary Finlayson, daughter of John and Augusta Finlayson of Glendower Plantion, after her death he married her sister Augusta Finlayson.

EXCERPT FROM RICHARD MAYS WILL:
♦ It starts:As life is at best uncertain, and we should be prepared for its close by having our house “set in order:”
Mays divided his slaves among his wife and children and stated:
♦ "I commit my Negroes not as property but as human beings to be treated and cared for as such as a charge from God our Maker to them which must not be neglected; it is duty sanctioned by your interest, and their welfare. I charge you all before God see that with kindness, not foolish indulgence, and proper consideration for their circumstances and condition this obligation is felt and discharged."
"
These people are listed on the 1850 Madison County, Florida Census Transcription as living with Richard J. Mays.
Richard J. Mays (45)
Emily M. Mays (35)
Richard J. Mays (14)
Dennet H. Mays (10)
Thomas M. Mays (9)
James W. Mays (7)
Samuel P. Mays (4)
John B. Mays (2)
Walter T. Mays (1)
Richard's son John B. married Christine Bailey, daughter of William John Bailey of Lyndhurst Plantation
     +Richard Mays is listed in the Madison County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as Age 45 having 77 slaves, 3,360 acres and 200 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.
¤Richard Mays listed in Madison County Tax Book, dated 1860 as having 1,200 acres and 93 slaves


-------------------------


Rhydon G. Mays
Location: Madison County


♦Rhydon Grigsby Mays, a son of Samuel and Nancy Grigsby Mays, had other planter brothers --James, Enoch and Richard Mays.
All listed as having one of the largest plantation in Madison County in 1850
♠Rhydon had the largest cotton production of the Mays in 1850. He moved to Putnam county in 1852 to grow oranges and sold his land to Owens Sullivan and Nancy Delaughter.
4Rydon (born in 1801) was married to Sarah Butler Mays.
These people are listed on the 1850 Madison County, Florida Census Transcription as living with R. G. Mays.
R. G. Mays (49)
Sarah B. Mays (47)
Elizabeth Mays (20)
Samuel B. Mays (18)
Sarah Mays (16)
Susan Mays (14)
William Mays (10)
Frances Mays

     +Rhydon G. Mays is listed in the Madison County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as Age 49 having 82 slaves, 1,516 acres and 240 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.


-------------------------


Enoch Mays
Location: Madison County


♦Enoch Grigsby Mays ,the youngest son of Samuel and Nancy Grigsby Mays, had other planter brothers --James, Richard and Rhydon G. Mays.
All are listed as having one of the largest plantation in Madison County in 1850
4Enoch (born 1816) was married to Chlotide Elizabeth Linton.
These people are listed on the 1850 Madison County, Florida Census Transcription as living with Enoch G. Mays.
Enoch G. Mays (34)
Caroline Mays (31)
Mary E. Mays (10)
Samuel R. Mays (7)
William R. Mays (6)
Sarah C. Mays (4)
Margaret Mays (1)


     +Enoch Mays is listed in the Madison County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as Age 34 having 21 slaves, 1000 acres and 70 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.


-------------------------


J.G Mays
Location: Madison County


-----This may be James Butler Mays Jr. born 1836, the son of James Butler Mays Sr.
son of Samuel and Nancy Grigsby Mays and brother of Richard, Rhydon and Enoch Mays,
who came to Madison county with his brother Richard and died in 1836 from wounds
received in the Seminole War, the year his son was born.
James Butler Mays Sr. did own land in Madison County
The initials may have been B instead of ------

¤J. G. Mays listed in Madison County Tax Book, dated 1860 as having 1,360 acres and 36 slaves



--------------------------------------------


Martha P and Dorothy Triplett
¹Lebanon Plantation
Jefferson County

     +Dorothy Triplett is listed in the Jefferson County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as Age 20 having 15 slaves, 120 acres and 112 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.
     +Martha Triplett is listed in the Jefferson County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as Age 47 having 26 slaves, 440 acres and 100 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.


-------------------------------


Dr. William Hall Stringfellow
Stringfellow Plantation
Location: Alachua County

♣♣Dr. William Hall Stringfellow (1818-1869) from S.C., the son of William and Patience Buford Stringfellow, married Julia Eliza Rainey, they had two children, William Jr. and Eliza (who married George Broome, son of John Broome . Patience died not long after the birth of her last child. Later Stringfellow married a widow, Mrs. Sarah Dogan Wright. Some of the children of Benjamin and Sarah are Clarence, Sallie, Thornton Buford, and James.



-------------------------------


David R. Williams
Location: Alachua County

These are the people listed in the 1860 census for Alachua county that lived in the house with David R. Williams:
Williams David R. (37)
Williams Kati B. (33)
Williams Serena C. (11)
Williams Mary B. (10)
Williams Stephen M. (7)
Williams David R. (3)

¤D. R. Williams listed in Alachua County Tax Book, dated 1860 as having 1,000 acres and 152 slaves



-------------------------------


Angus Finlayson
Location: Jackson county

----- I beleive there is a kinship between Angus Finlayson and John Finlayson of Glendower Plantation.
It could be as close as brothers. -----


Angus Finlayson is listed as being from S.C. married Martha E. Rogers.
These people are listed on the Jackson, FL 1860 Federal Census as living with Angus Finlayson.
Finlayson Angus (47 Farmer)
Martha (46)
Mary M. (17)
Ladora P. (13)
James A. (11)
Cristianna J. (10)
William D. (6)
Henry A. (4)
Long John C. L. (22)
Susan A. (19)
Vicker Alexander M. (25 )


Angers Finlayson is listed on the SlaveHolders In Jackson County Florida 1860 as having 33 slaves and 8 dwellings for them.

¤Angus Finlayson listed in Jackson County Tax Book, dated 1860 as having 880 acres and 33 slaves

-------------------------------




[ Alpha List]
Ante Bellum Plantations
[ 2] [ 3] [ 4] [ 5] [ 6] [ 7] [ 8]

Plantations
[ 1] [ 2] [ 3] [4] [ 5]

Post Civil War Plantations
[ Part 1]

Gadsden-Jackson-Jefferson-Leon- Madison County Plantation Placement Maps
[ Plantation Placement Map]

More Plantations
[ Part 1] [ Part 2] [ Part 3] [ Part 4] [ Part 5] [ Part 6] [ Part 7] [ Part 8] [ Part 9] [ Part 10] [ Part 11] [ Part 12] [ Part 13] [ Part 14] [ Part 15]



[Florida Index]
Some Facts and Photos
[1] [2] [ 3] [ 4] [Currency]
[Eatonville] [Lighthouses] [Art Deco- South Beach] [Kingsley Plantation]
[Native Floridians] [James Weldon Johnson] [Mary Mc Leod Bethune]
[The Knotts] [Zora Neale Hurston] [John Ringling] [Eartha M. M. White]
[A. Philip Randolph]
[Poets Corner
(Biography's)]




Reference, Research and Source Information

* and **Slavery and Plantation Growth in Antebellum Florida,1821-1860
by Julie Floyd Smith
Gainesville University of Florida Press
*pages 122-124
**pages 214-222

Florida Heritage Collection

Florida Historic Marker Program

The book: Florida Journalism During The Civil War
by Horance Gibbs Davis,Jr
Publisher: University of Florida -- Gainesville -- 1952

Exploring Florida


Col. Robert Howard Gamble

Florida State On Line Park Guide

Jewish Virtual Library

Go 2 Amelia Island

Some information is from:
The Library of Congress
American Memory
Red Bank Plantation


Photo of The Sugar Mill and Gamble House is from:
Exploring Florida

Photo of Bellevue and some information courtesy of:
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, STATE TECHNOLOGY OFFICE
My Florida. Com
Office of Cultural and Historical Programs
Leon County

Photo of Goodwood Plantation is copyrighted:
The Florida Center for Instructional Technology,
University of South Florida

♥ This info is from:
In Their Footsteps
A Veterans Day Address By John H. Croom
Harmony Hall, Kinston, North Carolina
November 11, 2007


LA GALLERY

Creating an Old South
by Edward E. Baptist

The Southwood House
Some information on Greenfield Plantation is from:
Description of the Greenfield Plantation, Duval County, Florida, 1851
File contributed for use in USGenWeb Archives
by Downie Granville, GGranville@aol.com

†Image Reference
JCB_01138-1

Source Résumé du témoignage donné devant un comité de la chambre des communes de la Grande Bretagne et de l'Irelande, touchant la traite des Negroes (Geneva,1814), fold-out plate, following title page in 4th pamphlet of vol. 15 of a collection with binder title "Melanges sur l'Amerique" (Copy in the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University)

Comments Shows the two major slave decks and how enslaved Africans were crammed into them. Top, Plan of the Platform, shows the deck which held females, ranged around its outer circumference; in the center, the label "Cargaison Anglaises de Negroes" (English Cargo of Negroes). The bottom shows the plan of the main deck ("Plan du Grand Pont"), where males were kept. This image seems to be derived from the well-known illustration of the slave ship "Brookes" (see images E014, Wad-1, on this website), but with its own embellishments. For example, what appears to be a woman giving birth is shown on the top deck, just below the word "Cargaison." (This feature was noticed by Sylvia Frey, and brought to our attention by Leslie Tobias Olson). This pamphlet appears to be the French translation of some abstract or abridgment of evidence given before a British House of Commons committee investigating the Atlantic slave trade in the early 1790s.
as shown on www.slaveryimages.org

¹This info is from:
The Goodwood Museum

‡This info is from:
The Red Hill of Florida 1528-1865
by: Clifton Paisley
The University of Alabama Press
Page 88, 89, 220

♣This info is from:
UNC University Libraries


¤This info is from:
Slavery and Plantation Growth in Antebellum Florida 1821-1860
By: Julie Floyd Smith
Gainesville University of Florida Press
Appendix B

♣♣This info is from:
Slavery and Plantation Growth in Antebellum Florida 1821-1860
By: Julie Floyd Smith
Gainesville University of Florida Press
page 47

♠This info is from:
The Red Hill of Florida 1528-1865
by: Clifton Paisley
The University of Alabama Press
page 150

♦This info is from:
A paper presented to a public forum during the spring meeting of the
Florida Baptist Historical Society
April 23, 2004
In the 1898 Sanctuary of the First Baptist Church of Madison
By Phil Heard


4This info is from:
The Family of Mays

5This info is from:
Betton Hill Nature Center


--------------------

I have sincerely and honestly tried to follow all guidelines, terms of use and copyright notices for using information from the above sources and have given complete titles, web site addresses, credit, etc. to the best of my abilities.
I take no credit for any of the information and have no personal knowledge of the events and I am not representing such.
If the information I have provided concerning where and how the information was obtained is not properly done or credited, it is in no way intentional.






 


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