The Slave's Complaint

AM I sadly cast aside,
On misfortune's rugged tide?
Will the world my pains deride
Forever?

Must I dwell in Slavery's night
And all pleasure take its flight,
Far beyond my feeble sight,
Forever?

Worst of all, must hope grow dim,
And withhold her cheering beam?
Rather let me sleep and dream
Forever!

First 3 verses of The Slave's Complaint
By: George Moses Horton (a slave) ¹Picking cotton


Florida's AnteBellum Plantations 3


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Elijah Bryan


Restored Great Oaks Plantation

Elijah Bryan(father)
Hamilton Bryan (son)
Great Oaks Plantation
Location: Jackson County

An antebellum plantation which acquired its name from a row of live oaks lining the road in front of it.
Elijah Bryan (1793-1852) married Elizabeth Penelope Bryan (1801-1870) and they had many children. one was Hamilton G. Bryan (1831-1886).
Some sources states that the father(Elijah Bryan) built Great Oaks and others state it was built by the son (Hamilton Bryan) for his mother in 1860. Still another source state that Great Oaks was owned by Edward Bryan.
♦Mr. Bryan had a well written will that appointed his wife, Penelope and his son, Hamilton as executors of his estate. The original plantation burned down eight years after Elijah's death. --- This info would be consistent with the info that Elijah was the original owner and that Hamilton did build (rebuild) the house for his mother.---
There is a historical marker for Great Oaks plantation. SEE BELOW:

Image courtesy:Image courtesy: Waymarking.com

The inscription reads:
GREAT OAKS
THIS ANTEBELLUM MANSION WAS BUILT BY HAMILTON BRYAN AS A
HOME FOR HIS MOTHER IN 1860 ON THE 5200 ACRE PLANTATION
ESTABLISHED BY HIS FATHER, ELIJAH BRYAN. BOTH OF THESE MEN
ARE BURIED IN THE GREENWOOD BAPTIST CHURCH CEMETERY. IT WAS
SOLD BY THEIR DESCENDANTS TO THE CLAUDE REESE FAMILY WHO
RESTORED IT BETWEEN 1961 AND 1965. EXCEPT FOR THE CHERRY
STAIR RAIL. IT IS BUILT ENTIRELY OF HEART YELLOW PINE. THE HOUSE
WAS PAINTED WHEN ORIGINALLY BUILT, BUT NEVER REPAINTED UNTIL
THE RESTORATION. IT HAS BEEN USED TWICE AS A PUBLIC SCHOOL
THE ORIGINAL SMOKE HOUSE STILL STANDS, AND THE FOUNDATIONS
OF THE KITCHEN CHIMNEY AND SLAVE HOUSE CHIMNEYS STILL EXIST.
GREAT OAKS STANDS AS A TRIBUTE TO ITS BUILDER.

JACKSON COUNTY HISTORICAL COMMISSION 1972

These people are listed on the Jackson, FL 1850 Federal Census as living with Elijah Bryan.
Bryan Elijah (55 Farmer)
Elizabeth (42)
Harriet (24)
Penelope (15)
Georgia (13)
Lousianna (11)
Laura (9 )
Emily (7)
Robert (4)
Elijah (1&6/12)
Bryan Edward Jr. ( 40 Farmer)
Nobles Jane (13)

+Elijah Bryan is listed in the Jackson County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as Age 55 having 48 slaves, 2,500 acres and 60 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.

Elijah Bryan (Estate) is listed on the SlaveHolders In Jackson County Florida 1860 as having 77 slaves and 14 dwellings for them.


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George Elliott Dennis
Location: Leon county

George E. Dennis is listed as being from N.C.
4He married Ellen Taylor in 1832.
These people are listed on the Leon county, FL 1850 Federal Census as living withGeorge E. Dennis.

Dennis George E. (45 Planter)
Dennis Ellen A. (40)
Miller George D. (14)
Dennis George E. (5)
Elliott Margaret J. (3)
Dennis Mary E. (10)
Dennis Martha (8 )
Dennis Anna (3)


George Dennis is listed on the Leon County 1845 Florida Voters List in PRECINCT #5.


+George E. Dennis is listed in the Leon County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as Age 45 having 45 slaves, 548 acres and 64 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.


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Kidder Meade Moore
Pine Tucky
Location: Jefferson County

†Seven miles from Waukeenah lies the historic plantation, Pinetucky, owned by Kidder Meade Moore,who was an early settler of Jefferson County. He married Caroline Croom the daughter of Joshua Croom (uncle of Bryan and Hardy Crooms of Goodwood Plantation), and Penelope Cobb of Leon County.
† Kidder and Caroline were the parents of at least four children: three boys, Tom, Egbert, and Willie, and a daughter Mary, who was married Oscar Christopher Edwards of Lloyd.
†Pintucky was not large house,situated on top of a hill, having six rooms, with a piazza on three sides and a portico in front, the kitchen being made of brick, which was separate from the house, which is not uncommon for those days.
‡‡According to the person account of life on Pine Tucky, Helen Moore states that there were 3 cooks, who took turns cooking, "2 grown housemaids who kept the house, scoured the andirons and candle sticks and kept the walk swept in front of the house. When they finished the house duties they were required to sew or knit".
†After the Civil War, the two surviving brothers were married and the property divided.
Thomas Moore married Mary Y. Simmons, in 1871. She was the daughter of Thomas and Adeline Simmons of Monticello. Thomas and Mary Moore had two girls and four boys
†Thomas was an enthusiastic nut grower and when so many nurseries devoted their labor, time and ground to the propagation of fine, thin-shelled pecans, he grew some seedlings in his garden, one of which turned out to be a tree of much merit, bearing a nut well worthy of propagation which was named for him.
(The Moore is a long, medium sized, soft shelled, well flavored nut and is now recognized as the best commercial variety of pecans for this section of the South.)
The Moore tree is still standing and bearing regular crops of delicious nuts.


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Madison Starke Perry
Governor from 1857-1861
Photograph courtesy of:
Florida Governors' Portraits Collection

Madison Starke Perry
Location: Alachua county

¹The 4th governor of Florida, came to Florida in the 1830s and became a leader among the area’s plantation owners.
%Madison Perry was born in Lancaster District, South Carolina, in 1814. He came to Florida in the 1830s and became a leader among the area's plantation owners, he was married to Martha Starke Peay.
His plantation was located about six miles east of Gainesville in the area of present-day Rochelle.
%He died at his Alachua County plantation in March 1865. Perry is buried at Oak Ridge Cemetery on land he set aside in 1854 for the community. Buried here with him are his wife, Martha Starke Perry; a daughter Sallie Perry; and a son, Madison Starke Perry, Jr.

²Governor Madison S. Perry is listed in the Tax Books, dated 1860 as having 3,000 acres and 35 slaves in Alachua county.

NOTE:
Three Florida towns are named after him: Madison, Starke, and Perry.

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~~~~~ The Branchs ~~~~~


John Branch
LEFT -- ¹Governor John Branch
RIGHT -- ***Live Oak plantation

John Branch
Waverly Plantation
Wood Lawn Plantation
Live Oak Plantation
Whitehead Place Plantation
and
William Henry Branch(son)

♥♥In the 1850's George Whitfield sold the northern part of his plantation to John Branch, and this became Waverly Plantation. Live Oak Plantation was Branch's main place.

♣♣ James Branch (1782-1863), was born in Halifax County, North Carolina, the son of wealthy landowners,John and Rebecca Bradford Branch (Called Mary). He was married to Elizabeth Foort, they raised nine children. One son, John Richard (b. 1819), died before John Branch, leaving children who were named in Branch's will. His daughter, Mary Eliza (b. 1815), first married Leigh Read and later married William Bailey. She was not named in her father's will, (died before Branch -- died 3 1/2 years after the birth of he son (1854) by William Bailey), as did two other children, James Branch (b. 1812) and Rebecca Bradford Branch (b. 1808)(Mrs. Robert White Williams).
The surviving children of John Branch included William Henry Branch (b. 1823) of Florida and Georgia, Sarah Harris (Sally) (b.1814), who married Dr. James Hunter, Martha (b. 1806), married to (♠♠Edward Bradford of Pine Hill Plantation ) of Florida; Susan (b. 1826), wife of Arvah Hopkins of Florida; and Margaret (b. 1810) (Mrs. Daniel S. Donelson) of Tennessee.
♣♣About 1833, Branch began acquiring property near Tallahassee, Florida. Branch moved to Leon County, Florida, where he lived for much of the next decade-and-a-half on his Live Oak Plantation, his main plantation.
♣♣Branch died in Enfield in January of 1863.
♣♣Live Oak was located in north central Leon County extending from the east shore of Lake Jackson to the western edge of Lafayette Township.
John grew cotton. He was governor of North Carolina (1817 to 1820), U.S. representative and senator 1823 to 1829, secretary of the Navy 1829 to 1831, governor of the Florida Territory 1843 to 1845, and a planter in North Carolina and Florida.
♣♣Branch son, William Henry Branch (1823-1910)was a cotton planter in Florida and merchant and farmer in Georgia.

These people are listed on the Leon, FL 1850 Federal Census as living with John Branch.
John Branch (68)
Eliza B. (63)

² Agent John Branch is listed as have 1,560 acres and 68 slaves in the Tax Book dated 1860. (He may have been agent for L.H. Branch estate)


♠♠John Branch is listed in the Leon County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as being 68 years old and having 104 slaves, 2,320 acres and 235 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.


NOTE:
♣John Branch had a son names William Henry Branch (William H. Branch) and a grandson named William Horton Branch (William H. Branch), called Horton by the family.
Upon the death of his wife, Branch returned to North Carolina, where he later married Mary Eliza (Jordan) Bond, with whom he had no children. Branch died in North Carolina in 1863 and was buried there.

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William Henry Branch

♣♣William Henry Branch (1823-1910), son of John Branch of Waverly Plantation. A cotton planter in Florida and merchant and farmer in Georgia
William was born 9 October 1823 and died 20 October 1910.
In 1848, he married Mary Eliza Horton, daughter of R. Horton of Huntsville, Alabama. He was a licensed attorney and planter in Florida until 1866, when he moved to Georgia, where he became a small merchant and farmer.
The William Henry Branch family lived in Baker County (Newton, Branchville); in Colquitt County (Felix), where Branch served as county commissioner and postmaster and was involved in local politics; and finally in various places in Mitchell County, including Camilla, Magnolia, Pelham, Pebble City, and Sale City, or on farms near these towns.
William Henry and Mary Eliza had several children, among them were,William Horton, Lucie and Josie.
Mary Eliza Branch died in 1871.
William Henry's son William Horton Branch, (1852-1920) was born on Live Oak Plantation.
Branch was called William H. or W.H.; his son, William Horton Branch, called Horton by the family, signed his name W. Horton Branch and was frequently addressed as W.H. In many of the later Papers, it is difficult to determine which Branch was indicated by W.H.
Horton moved to Georgia in 1876 and married.

¤W. H. Branch listed in Leon County Tax Book, dated 1860 as having 1,070 acres and 57 slaves


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Joseph L. Branch
Location: Leon County

♦♦♦Joseph Branch (1817-1867) married Ann Pillow Martin in 1848. Ann died after 5 yars of marriage and Joseph moved away from Florida.
Joseph later married Mary Jones Polk in 1859.
He was, the nephew of Gov. John Branch, the son of Joseph (1778-1827) (brother of James Branch) and Susan O'Brian Branch and brother of James H. Branch.
These people are listed on the Leon, FL 1850 Federal Census as living with Joseph Branch.
Branch Joseph (33)
Branch Anna P. (21)
Branch George M. (1)

♠♠Joseph L. Branch is listed in the Leon County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as Age 33 having 7 slaves, - acres and 95 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.



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James H. Branch
Location: Leon County

James was the youngest son of Joseph (1778-1827) (brother of James Branch) and Susan O'Brian (O'Bryan) Branch, married Mary E. Watkins in 1855. He was the brother of Joseph Branch (1817-1867) and nephew of Gov. John Branch.
These people are listed on the Leon, FL 1850 Federal Census as living with Joseph Branch.
Branch James H. 25

♠♠James H. Branch is listed in the Leon County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as Age 25 having 34 slaves, 720 acres and 84 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.



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L. H.. Branch
Location: Leon County

This L. H. Branch MAY BE Lewis Henry Branch (1815-1849) who was married to Sally Crowell Whitaker (her name was somtimes listed as "Sara"), daughter of Eli Benton Whitaker.
These people are listed on the Leon, FL 1850 Federal Census as living with Sarah C. Branch.
Branch Sarah C. (23)
Branch Joseph (5)


♠♠L. H. Branch Estate is listed in the Leon County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as Age - having 32 slaves, 860 acres and 80 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.


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Judge Thomas Randall
Belmont Plantation
Location: Jefferson County

Thomas was married to Laura Wirt, daughter of William Wirt of Wirtland Plantation and niece of John and Robert Gamble
Randall and Laura had at least 3 daughters. Judge Randall divided his attention between court duties and plantation affairs.
Belmont was situated between Welaunee and Waukeenah Plantations.
After the death of his wife,Laura, Randall moved to Tallahassee but still farmed Belmont.
²Listed in the 1860, Tax Book as having 4,080 acres and 42 slaves.

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Harwood
Norman Harwood
† Formerly Captain James Ormond's plantation Damietta,Norman B. Harwood of Minneapolis bought the property more than four decades later after the destruction by the Indians. He also bought Rosetta(Rozetta) and other plantations, in all 40,000 acres, in the name of his wife Susan. He set out orange groves and made an attempt to raise cattle.
He was ostracized in the Halifax area,because, having avoided his debts in Minnesota, he arrived with a poor reputation. During the five years living at Harwood he contracted more debt and this time there seem to be no way to escape. He had, however, a life insurance of $45,000, so found a way out by taking poison. He died in the upstairs south room of his house, which is still standing.


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Photo Credit: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, Florida Memory Project


Col. Robert Butler
Lake Jackson Plantation
Location: Leon County

Col Robert Butler (1786-1860), (4)married to Rache1 Hays was Florida’s first Surveyor General
(4)Robert and Rachael had 10 children: Thomas P. Butler, b. 1809, Sarah Jane Butler, b. 1811, Robert Hays Butler, b.1813, Jackson Orleans Butler, b.1815, Ellen Mary Butler, b.1820, Eliza Narcissa Butler, b.1822, Rachel Jackson Butler, b. 1824, William Edward Butler, b. 1826, Andrew Jackson Butler, b. 1828, Mary Lucinda Butler, b. 1830.
These people are listed on the Leon, FL 1850 Federal Census as living with Robert Butler.
Butler Robert (63)
Butler Rachel (63)
Col. Robert Butler's plantation was locate at what is today know as the Lake Jackson Mounds Lake Jackson Mounds Archaeological State Park

♠♠Robert Butler is listed in the Leon County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as Age 63 having 52 slaves, 1,069 acres and 55 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.




~~~~ The Bellamys ~~~~



Pictured is Titled: Bellamy Plantation
Don't know the name of the plantation
or which Bellamy it belong to.



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John Jack Bellamy
Location: Jefferson County

John Jack Bellamy came to Florida in 1819, settling at Hogan's Creek or Cow Ford, then a small settlement on the St. John's river. In 1821, he was one of the three settlers who planned a map and laid out a town at that point, naming it Jacksonville.
With him was his Wife, Margaret Bell, and five children, Abram, William, Mary Elizabeth , Sarah Matilda and Bethel. John Jack also had a daughter Named Lydia born in 1814. and a daughter named Theresa who married someone with the last name Read.
John Jack Bellamy and his family, with the exception of Abraham (Abram) -- (Jack's father was also named Abraham (Abram) (1752-1819, mother was Claramond Bellamy (1757 - 1833), --moved to Jefferson county in 1824.
His youngest son, Bethel, born in 1812 died unmarried; his daughter, Sarah Matilda, born in South Carolina in 1808, was married to Colonel Burch of the United States army; his oldest daughter, Mary Elizabeth , born in 1804, was the wife of William Bailey; and the second son, William, born in 1802, was married to Emmala Ann Simkins.(see below)
When the territorial council agreed to build a road, twenty-five feet in width, from Pensacola to St. Augustine, John Jack Bellamy was given one of the contracts.
He owned two hundred slaves, and as soon as the road was surveyed by his son-in-law, Colonel Burch, he started them to work and built his portion of the road, finishing it about 1824. It was a fine clay and sand road, and as picturesque a one as ever was seen in the South. Wide spreading live oaks bordered each side, their branches intertwined and woven together with Cherokee rose vines, yellow jasmine and wild honeysuckle, which, in springtime was a mass of luxuriant, colorful blossoms.
The state contracted with builders of roads and public works in the early days of the territory, to grant to them tracts of virgin timbered lands in renumeration for their services. In this way, Jack Bellamy became the owner of several thousand acres of land, eight miles east of Monticello, along the old Jacksonville dirt road. It was an expanse of beautiful, hilly country, with woodlands and streams abounding. He built his home on a red clay hill, in a grove of hickory nut and live oak trees. One half mile to the southwest, a private or family burial ground was laid out and a brick wall surrounded it.
Today it is a most interesting place to visit, especially to the many Bellamy descendants in the county.
He was an industrious planter and a man of business acumen, which resulted in his becoming one of the wealthiest land owners in the State.
He believed in educating the youth of the country and as early as 1840 he planned an Academy at Aucilla, by applying for a charter. He took an active part in the county's history.
When Jack Bellamy died, his home and many acres of land were left to William, his youngest son, who married Emmala Simkins (daughter of Smith and Mary Ware Smith.

**NOTE **
MANY SITES AND BOOK LIST JOHN JACK AND MARGARET BELLAMY'S DAUGHTER
"MARY ELIZABETH BELLAMY BAILEY" AS ELIZABETH MARY. BUT THE GRAVE STONE
LOCATED IN BELLAMY CEMETERY HAVE HER NAME AS MARY ELIZABETH.
click here TO VIEW GRAVE STONE.
~~~ Inscription ~~~

In memory of
Mrs. MARY ELIZABETH BAILEY
Wife of
General William Bailey
BORN FEB. 27,1804.
DIED JAN. 12,1849.
Blessed are the pur in heart,
for they shall see God.




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William Bellamy and Emmala Bellamy


Silhouette of William Bellamy
click image for larger view
Photo courtesy: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://floridamemory.com/items/show/33927


Location: Jefferson County

‡ William Bellamy was born in 1802 , second son of John Jack Bellamy. He and his wife, Emmala Ann Simkins Bellamy, came in possession of his plantation when his father died and he inherited it.
They were the parents of four daughters; Elizabeth, who became the wife of Dr. George Washington Parkhill, the son of John Parkhill of Leon County.
Margaret, who married Richard Turnbull,
Emmala, the wife of Richard Call Parkhill
and William, who was named for her father. A few months after her birth William Bellamy died, July 10, 1846, and having no sons, his wife had to take upon her shoulders the onerous burden of running a plantation of many acres and numerous slaves. She had a very good overseer.
In a few years, her health failed and she was laid to rest by the side of her husband.
Emmala A Bellamy is listed in the 1850, Jefferson county largest Plantation and  ♥In the Jefferson County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules having 209 slaves, 3,760 acres valued at $4,000, 121 (400 lbs.) bales of cotton.

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Nakoosa
* Florida Photographic Collection

Abraham (Abram) Bellamy
Nakoosa
Location: Jefferson County

Elizabeth Ann (Williams) Bellamy Bailey
wife
( After Bellamy's death, married William J. Bailey)
Photo courtesy: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://floridamemory.com/items/show/33926

‡Abraham (Abram) Bellamy born in South Carolina in 1800, oldest son of John Jack Bellamy, was the first lawyer in Jacksonville, but, as better opportunities to advance in his profession could be found in St. Augustine, he made that his home.
In 1825 he had married Eliza A. Williams, whose mother was of Spanish descent.
Abraham (Abram), moved with his family to Jefferson county, from St. Augustine in 1827. He took a great interest in the development of Florida and that of Jefferson county, especially during the Indian Wars, but in 1839 he succumbed to the strenuous life of those hard, pioneer days. He was an intellectual man, full of mental vigor, a brave patriot and an upright citizen.
His widow with six children consisting of one son, Burton, and five daughters, two of whom ' were twins,(two of the daughters were named Theodosia and Victoria) inherited Abraham's (Abram), his grandfather, wealth, which was a large fortune.
He had been endowed with an inheritance from his grandfather's estate, and with a legacy from his father, which, added to his own accumulated property and that of his wife, insured her and her children comfort and luxury.
♣Included among Abraham's (Abram) assets was money loaned at interest. Until his children reached maturity the income from the interest accruing on bonds and notes was used for their support, maintenance, and education.
Nakossa was put in the hands of a Bellamy connection Daniel Bird.
Abraham's (Abram) widow, Eliza, remarried in 1844 William J. Bailey of Lyndhurst.

**NOTE **
Abraham's (Abram) and Eliza also had a son named Samuel Juniuswho was born in 1826 and died in 1829.

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Samuel Bellamy
Rock Cave
Location: Jackson County

Samuel Bellamy was married to Elizabeth Jane Croom, sister to Hardy and Bryan Croom of Goodwood Plantation and George Alexander Crooms of Casa de Lago, (a few sources holds to the sad legend that she died on her wedding night after being badly burned ), Samuel and Elizabeth was married in 1834 at her family home in North Carolina, their son, Alexander, was born in late 1835, Elizabeth died in 1837 of illness ( a mosquitoborne fever) and their 18 month old son, Alexander, died a few days later of the same illness, she was 18,(Samuel was also ill but recovered). His brother Edward C Bellamy was married to Elizabeth's sister, Ann Crooms.

----The bottomlands of the Chipola River were indeed ideal for the production of cotton, but they
were also breeding grounds for vast swarms of mosquitoes. Deadly fevers, including malaria,
ravaged the growing population throughout the early history of Jackson County. The young
Bellamy family was not spared. According to a December 6, 1836, letter from Hardy Bryan
Croom, Elizabeth’s half-brother, to his wife, the fevers had hit particularly hard that fall.
Samuel, Elizabeth and baby Alexander were all suffering from what likely was malaria. The
deadly fever was often described by doctors of the time as the “intermittent and remittent” fever
because patients often improved, only to relapse and in many cases die. Samuel C. Bellamy,
in fact, did recover from the fever, but his wife and child did not. According to an obituary in the
Tallahassee Floridian, eighteen-year-old Elizabeth Jane Croom Bellamy, as her tombstone
records, died on May 11, 1837.

The house built by Samuel, which was according to the legend, built for his bride-to-be, is reported
to have been built or completed in the 1840. ----

Samuel continued to construct and cultivate what is know as Rock Cave plantation.
†Sam Bellamy, like other Floridians, suffered financially as a result of the Panic of 1837 and the difficulties of the second Seminole War.
Falling into debt, during the crisis years of the 1840's, sold his Rock Cave Plantation to his brother Edward to avoid bankruptcy.
†Samuel continued to live at Rock Cave and to claim it as legally his, but retaining possession of the property led to a bitter feud between Samuel and his brother Edward Bellamy (called Ned). Sam had sold his brother 1,200 acres and an unspecified number of slaves. The Union Bank held the mortgage on Rock Cave and by arrangement's terms the plantation would revert to Samuel provided he paid of the mortgage.
†The combined circumstances caused Samuel to enter a prolonged period of depression and gradually to develope a dependency on alcohol. Years of physical deterioration and economic ruin followed.
During the year of 1850 found Samuel trying to reposses the property
†Inevitable, the question of ownership led to a lawsuit.
By 1850 Samuel had no slaves at his residence and no land to cultivate. Embittered, he drafted a new will in 1851 that gave his estate, after the debts were paid, to his nephews Richard and Alexander Bellamy's, sons of his late brother Alexander A. Bellamy. Samuel included a caustic statements: " I do hereby most positively declare that none of my estate shall ever, in any event, go to Edward C. Bellamy or one of his heirs", was just one of several made.
Ironically, the case over Rock Cave plantation was finally settled in 1857 in favor of Samuel Bellamy. After the Union Bank's claims were paid, only a small amount was left for Samuels's nephews.
♠A few years later Samuel killed himself. Samuel never remarried.


----------------------

Edward C. Bellamy
Hickory Hill
Location: Jackson County


Edward C. Bellamy was married to Ann Croom, sister to Hardy and Bryan Croom of Goodwood Plantation and and George Alexander Crooms of Casa de Lago, Edward and Ann had a large family, his brother Samuel was married to Ann's sister, Elizabeth Jane Crooms.
†Early in the marriage Edward had sold his wife's property in North Carolina and used her slaves to get started in Florida.
♠ Bellamy's brother,Samuel,a doctor, fell into debt during the crisis years was forced to sell his Rock Cave Plantation to him to avoid bankruptcy. Afterwards much hostility existed between the brothers.(see Samuel Bellamy above)
♠A few years later Samuel killed himself.
†For a number of reasons Edward (Ned) decided in the late 1850's to leave Jackson County. His motives were economic, personal, and adventurous. In 1857 Edward sold Hickory Hills and moved to the Mississippi Delta and started a new plantation.
***In the Jackson County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules Bellamy is listed as being 49 years old, having 168 slaves, 4,000 acres farm valued at $30,000, 230 (400 lbs.) bales of cotton. ♠A few years later Samuel killed himself.

**NOTE **
♦Edward also had a brother Alexander A. Bellamy who had two sons Richard and Alexander.
All of the above graves (don't know about Samuel) are located at Bellamy Cemetery in Jefferson County.



----------------------

Robert A. Young
Location: Jackson county

Robert Young is listed as being from S. C.
These people are listed on the Jackson county, FL 1850 Federal Census as living with Robert A. Young.
Young Robert A. (44 Farmer)
Mary R. (35 )
Mary (18)
Landa (16)
Catharine (14)
John (11 )
Harriett (7)
George (5)
Camilla (1 )
Young James T. (27)
Nelson Jesse (27 Overseer)
These people are listed on the Jackson county, FL 1860 Federal Census as living with Robert Young.
Young Robert A. (50 Farmer)
James T. (35 Overseer)


+Robert Young is listed in the Jackson County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as Age 44 having 17 slaves, 800 acres and 100 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.

Robert A. Young is listed on the SlaveHolders In Jackson County Florida 1860 as having 25 slaves and 8 dwellings for them.


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Isaac Widgeon
Location: Jackson county

Isaac Widgeon is listed as being from Va. He was married to Hetty Robinson.
These people are listed on the Jackson county, FL 1850 Federal Census as living with Isaac Widgeon.
Widgeon Isaac (40 Merchant)
Hetty (34 )
Mary (11 )
John (10 )
George (8 )
Isaac (6 )
Hetty (4 )
Henry (10/12)
These people are listed on the Jackson county, FL 1860 Federal Census as living with Isaac Widgeon.
Widgeon Isaac (50 Merchant )
Hettie (44)
Mary (20)
John (19)
George (17)
Hettie (13)
Henry (10 )
Idda (8)
Ann C. (5)
Tina (3)
These people are listed on the Jackson county, FL 1880 Federal Census as living with Isaac Widgeon.
WIDGEON Issac (68 Retired Merchant)
WIDGEON Mary (38 Dau)
WIDGEON Carry (24 Dau)
WRIGHT Hetty (8 G Dau)
WRIGHT William B (5 G Son)


Issac Widgeon is listed on the SlaveHolders In Jackson County Florida 1860 as having 30 slaves and 4 dwellings for them.

+Isaac Widgeon is listed in the Jackson County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules. as Age 40 having 28 slaves, not given acres and 60 bales (400 lbs) of cotton.

----------------------------------------


J. P. Haywood
or
F. P. Haywood
Location Jackson county

----- On the 1860 Jackson county census McGriff, Richard 27yrs. as Overseer (Agent for L. P. Haywood).
There is a Haywood F. P. listed as 39 Farmer from N.C. on the 1850 Jackson county census. ----

Francis P. Haywood is listed on the SlaveHolders In Jackson County Florida 1860 as having 39 slaves and 9 dwellings for them.

I don't know if the 2 people are the same or different.

¤J. P. Haywood listed in Jackson County Tax Book, dated 1860 as having 2,480 acres and 39 slaves

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B. T. Spires
Location Jackson county

Boackey T. Spires is listed on the SlaveHolders In Jackson County Florida 1860 as having 42 slaves and 7 dwellings for them.

¤B. T. Spires listed in Jackson County Tax Book, dated 1860 as having 1,200 acres and 43 slaves

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J. H. Pooser
Location Jackson county

Jacob Pooser is listed as being from S.C.
Pooser Jacob H. (59 Farmer)
Eliza R. (54 )
J. Henry (23 School Teacher)
Mary E. (20 )
Charles W. (16)
Maria F. (13)
---- On the Jackson, FL 1860 Federal Census there is a Pooser, Jacob H. listed as 23 yrs School teacher and living with the John Davis Family. ----
Jacob Pooser is listed on the SlaveHolders In Jackson County Florida 1860 as having 33 slaves and 8 dwellings for them.

¤J. H. Pooser listed in Jackson County Tax Book, dated 1860 as having 2,480 acres and 39 slaves

----------------------------------------


G. A. Parramore
Location: Madison county

---- Don't know if there is a kinship with Reddin W. Parramore. ----

¤G. A. Parramore listed in Madison County Tax Book, dated 1860 as having 1,360 acres and 27 slaves

----------------------------------------






[ Alpha List]

Ante Bellum Plantation
[ 1] [ 2] [ 4] [ 5] [ 6] [ 7] [ 8]

[Plantations Part 1] [Plantations Part 2] [ Plantations Part 3]
[Plantations Part 4] [Plantations Part 5]

Post Civil War Plantations

[ Part 1]

Gadsden-Jackson-Jefferson-Leon- Madison County Plantation Placement Maps
[ Plantation Placement Map]

More Plantations
[ Part 1] [ Part 2] [ Part 3] [ Part 4] [ Part 5] [ Part 6] [ Part 7] [ Part 8] [ Part 9] [ Part 10] [ Part 11] [ Part 12] [ Part 13] [ Part 14] [ Part 15]




[Florida Index]
Some Facts and Photos
[1] [2] [ 3] [ 4] [Currency]
[Eatonville] [Lighthouses] [Art Deco- South Beach] [Kingsley Plantation]
[Native Floridians] [James Weldon Johnson] [Mary Mc Leod Bethune]
[The Knotts] [Zora Neale Hurston] [John Ringling]
[Dr. John Gorrie] [George Proctor] [Eartha M. M. White]
[Poets Corner
(Biography's)]




Reference, Research and Source Information

Florida Heritage Collection

Florida Historic Marker Program

The book: Florida Journalism During The Civil War
by Horance Gibbs Davis,Jr
Publisher: University of Florida -- Gainesville -- 1952


Exploring Florida


Some information is from:
The Library of Congress
American Memory


Leon County

Creating an Old South
by Edward E. Baptist

**Photos and information courtesy of:
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, STATE TECHNOLOGY OFFICE
My Florida. Com

Office of Cultural and Historical Programs
Florida's History Through Its Places

¹Florida Governors' Portraits Collection

²Slavery and Plantation Growth in Antebellum Florida,1821-1860
by Julie Floyd Smith
Gainesville University of Florida Press
pages 214

³Slavery and Plantation Growth in Antebellum Florida,1821-1860
by Julie Floyd Smith
Gainesville University of Florida Press
pages 217

Some information on John Branch is from:
Manuscripts Department
Library of the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill
SOUTHERN HISTORICAL COLLECTION
#2718
BRANCH FAMILY PAPERS
Inventory


***Photo courtesy of:
Florida Memory Project-Photographic Collection

† This info is from:
Ruins of the early plantations of the Halifax area, Volusia County Florida
by Edith P. Stanton

****This info is from:
The Red Hill of Florida 1528-1865
by: Clifton Paisley
Jackson County 1850 Tax Roll and U.S. Agriculture Census Schedules
pg 215

♠This info is from:
Creating an Old South
By: Edward Baptist
Page: 258

‡This info is from:Digital History Project

♥This info is from:
The Red Hill of Florida 1528-1865
by: Clifton Paisley
Pages 223

♣ This info is from:
Slavery and Plantation Growth in Antebellum Florida 1821-1860
By: Julie Floyd Smith
Page 185

Digital History Project.pbworks.com

‡‡This info is from:
Slavery and Plantation Growth in Antebellum Florida 1821-1860
By: Julie Floyd Smith
Page 73

♥♥This info is from:
The Red Hill of Florida 1528-1865
by: Clifton Paisley
The University of Alabama Press
Page 133

♣♣This info is from:
UNC University Libraries

♠♠This info is from:
The Red Hill of Florida 1528-1865
by: Clifton Paisley
The University of Alabama Press
Page 219

†This info is from:
The Crooms Family and Goodwood Plantation
Land, Litigation, and Douthers Lives
By: William Warren Rogers and Erica R. Clark
Page 130-138

% Department of Growth Management - Alachua County, Florida

♦This info is from:
Slavery and Plantation Growth in Antebellum Florida 1821-1860
By: Julie Floyd Smith
Page 75

+This info is from:
The Red Hill of Florida 1528-1865
by: Clifton Paisley
The University of Alabama Press
Appendix 1- 5

♦This info is from: an artical in the Jackson County Times
Dated Feb. 22, 2013
Titled: The Restoration of Great Oaks

♦♦♦This info is from:
Descendants of John Branch

(4)This info is from:
Robert COLONEL Butler (b. December 25, 1786, d. January 13, 1860)
Family Tree

4This info is from:
Leon county Marriage Index: 1825 - 1850


--------------------

I have sincerely and honestly tried to follow all guidelines, terms of use and copyright notices for using information from the above sources and have given complete titles, web site addresses, credit, etc. to the best of my abilities.
I take no credit for any of the information and have no personal knowledge of the events and I am not representing such.
If the information I have provided concerning where and how the information was obtained is not properly done or credited, it is in no way intentional.





 


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